FIFTH INTERNATIONAL DOCOMOMO CONFERENCE
VISION AND REALITY: SOCIAL ASPECTS OF ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN PLANNING IN THE MODERN MOVEMENT

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Fifth International Docomomo Conference

Vision and Reality: Social Aspects of Architecture and Urban Planning in the Modern Movement, Stockholm (September 16–18, 1998), (305 p.)

Keynote Lectures

The Modern Vision and its Critics by Sverker Sörlin — ‘Visions:’ An Empty Expression or a Designed Future? For a Return to the Tasks and Goals of Architecture by Werner Oechslin — The Social Concepts of Modernism and their Application in Different States by Winfried Nerdinger — Contradictions and Achievements of the Modern Movement in the United States, 1932–50 by Diane Ghirardo

Nordic Session

Modernism as a Vehicle for Social Change in the Nordic Welfare-States by Nils-Ole Lund — ‘One Day We Shall Inherit the Earth:’ Swedish Functionalism as a Vision and in Reality by Eva Rudberg — Norway by Brigitte Sauge — Vision and Reality: Denmark by Ola Wedebrunn — Finnish Modernism: Future Ideas and Hard Realities by Maija Kairamo — Social Aspects and Modern Architecture in Iceland by Petur H. Armannsson

Primary Session

Confronting the ‘Modern’ in Architecture: The Limits, the Limit by Maristella Casciato — The Eichler Homes and the Hybridization of California Modernism by Paul Adamson — The Birth of Modern Architecture in Japan: Internal and External Aspects in the 1920s and 1930s by Hiroyuki Suzuki — Montevideo 1930–40: Modern Architecture and Urbanism as Symbol of Liberty and Prosperity by Ruben Otero — The Kibbutz: MoMo and Romantic Architecture in an Agricultural Commune by Arie Sivan — Modernity and Typology: Standard Versus Outstanding by Gérard Monnier — The Modern Movement in Hong Kong by Desmond Hui — Portugal, the Modern Rupture: The Fifties ‘Green Years’ by Ana Tostões — Czech Residential Architecture: Its Social Aspects and Consequences after World War II by Jan Sedlak — Convenio Escolar: Modern Architecture at the Service of Public Education by Angela West Pedrao — ‘What Belongs to Architecture?’ Avant-Garde Ideas in the MoMo’s Discourse by Hilde Heynen

Social Housing

MoMo’s Second Chance: The Revaluation of Urban Housing by John Allan — Swedish Multifamily Housing From the ‘Record Years’ of 1961–75: Homes Worth Care, or Built for Change? by Sonja Vidén — Social and Political Battles Over an Urban Renewal Project, Public Housing in Canada: The Case of Les Habitations Jeanne-Mance and the Dozois Plan by Michèle Picard — Renewal, Rejection and Restitution: 40 Years of Comprehensive Development in the Gorbals by David Whitham — Social Housing in New York City: The Standardization of Innova by Andrew Wolfram & Chandler McCoy

Landscape

Nature and Architecture: Ibirapuera Park in Sao Paulo by Fernanda Fernandes da Silva — Garden Alterations: Nature and Modernity in Postwar Sweden by Thorbjörn Andersson — Paradise Promised: Modern Houses, Gardens and Planned Communities in Post-World War II Los Angeles by Katherine Wentworth Rinne & Katherine Spitz — A Landscape ‘Fit for a Democracy:’ Joze Plecnik at Prague Castle (1920–35) by Caroline Constant — Landscape vs. Modern Architecture by Alan Powers — Nature and History in Pikioni’s Acropolis Project by Dimitri Philippides — Rural Planning in Sicily Between the Two World Wars by Salvatore Di Fazio & Salvatore Contrafatto

Technology

Sources of MoMo Technology: ‘Wie Bauen?’ (1927–28) and the Dutch Results of a CIAM Inquiry ‘Functional Exterior Walls’ (1939) by Jos Tomlow — Social Aspects in MoMo Industrial Architecture and Architectural Industry by Stella Maris Casal — The Building Industry and the Modern Proposals for Economical Housing in Brazil, 1930–64 by Maria Lucia Caira Gitahy & Paulo Cesar Xavier Pereira — Steel Construction and Building Industry in Italy in the Thirties: Utopia and Reality in Experimental Designs by Anna Maria Zorgno

Conservation

Expiring Experiments: Dynamic in Conserving Dutch Concrete Housing Complexes by Marieke Kuipers — The Should Not of Conservation Doctrine: On the Legitimacy of Reconstruction of MoMo Architecture and Heritage by Cristina Lamandi — The Challenge of Authenticity for Modern Architecture and Heritage by France Vanlaethem — Miami Beach Tourism and Historic Preservation by Enrique H. Madia — Experiments in Siberian Constructivism During the 1920s by Ivan Nevzgodine

Urbanism

The Modernist Doctrine: Interpretation in Muesmann’s Plan of Sofia, 1938 by Dobrina Zeleva-Martins Viana — Marching Together to the Capitalist Future: State Social Housing and Laissez-faire Nationalism in Hong Kong and Singapore by Miles Glendinning — Social Ambitions in Belgian Modern Housing Projects from the 1920s to the 1960s by Luc Verpoest, Jean-Marc Basyn & Els Claessens — Was Archigram Modern or What Should We do With the South Bank? by James Dunnett — Losses and Legacies: Vancouver’s Burrard Street by Robert G. Lemon — The Postwar Modern City, Problem Child or Challenge? by Rob Docter — Rio de Janeiro, México, Caracas: University Cities and Modernities 1936–62 by Hugo Segawa — Te Aro Replanned, Repopulated by Paul Walker

Register: Tourism and Architecture by José Antonio Sosa & M. Luisa Gonzalez — Social Aspiration and Modern Architecture in Greece During the Twenties and Thirties by Panayotis Tournikiotis — Pre- and Post-1945 Public Housing in Hungary: Dilemmas About Their Listing and Preserving by András Ferkai — Modernism and Folk Architecture: The Reinterpretation of the Modern Architecture Aesthetics in the Folk Houses of North-Eastern Brazil by Maria de Betânia Uchôa Cavalcanti — Architecture, Conservation, Identification: A Case for the Recent, a Case for the Ordinary by Alexandra Teague

Education

The Teaching of Construction in the Domain of Architecture by Sylvia Ficher — Docomomo, Education and Redesign: Conservation of an Urban Opportunity Area of Buenos Aires, a Question of Principles and Methodology by Mabel M. Scarone — The Value of Objectivity by Irénée Scalbert

Towards the next Conference: Brasilia

Beside the Conference

List of Participants

Additional information

Weight 0.880 kg
Dimensions 21 × 2 × 30 cm